A 360 view

Yesterday was Luke’s 11th birthday, which of course means that I get to buy him cool stuff that I want.  Since his sister got a new iPod, we thought it only fitting that he could get something on a similar level, so, an XBox 360 became the logical choice.  The two of us have been playing on the XBox since I’ve known Luke, so I wanted to stick with a system he’s familiar with (and that wasn’t completely outrageously priced, just moderately so), so that’s what we wound up with.  He was also hoping to get a used Xbox to take to his Dad’s house, but now he can take his old one (as soon as we upgrade the hard drive).  Now for anyone who’s known anything about the 360, they know it’s been problematic.  A good portion of the original series would overheat and break frequently, showing the ‘red ring of death’, so it was important to me to get it registered right away and make sure that we were all covered ‘just in case’.  Here’s where the annoyance factor went up.

Recently there’s been a move to ‘everything online all the time’ such as software as a service, and all gaming platforms having to have a network connection of some sort to play online versus random people around the world.  Unlike the competitor products, Microsoft hits you not only with the high console price, but then to play online, there’s a fee.  The worst part to me is that even to register the new purchased console, I have to go set up an account on this Microsoft XBox Live.  So 20 minutes after first registering Luke, then myself because I have to have parental controls since he’s not old enough to sign the terms and conditions, I finally get the thing registered.  No longer do I need to put in the date and place of sale, it was ALREADY THERE.  I was a little creeped out by that … but at least I didn’t need my receipt, it was not in the bag, and who knows where at this point.

So what exactly is the point of this message other than to complain about the practices of Microsoft?  It is a not-so-subtle reminder that we as consumers expect to be online everywhere now, in our cars, on our phones, on our gaming systems. Each of these platforms has a way to browse the Internet, but can’t necessarily install software packages, so now IS the time for website programming to shine.  Software as a service, which is much of what DDA Apps is all about, builds those custom solutions within your websites to get done whatever it is you need done, whether sitting on a desktop computer or your PDA while on a train.  We can program a website that integrates data and video and display it in a well-designed manner, just the way you want it.  Custom website programming, that’s what I do (when I’m not playing video games at home).