Always Learning

One thing I really like about my role as a creative copywriter and project coordinator here at DDA is how much I continue to learn every day. With such a wide variety of clients from all different industries and areas, and the constant expansion of DDA’s services and capabilities, I have written about everything from roofing materials and “green” business practices to corporate and medical training, high school sports, customized online applications, and advanced chemicals.

This week, I’ve been helping to write some content for a machining company that is developing a new website. Just like with the first page I wrote on the roofing site, I’ve had to do a decent amount of research. But thanks to my friends Google, Wikipedia, and a few online machining trade publications, I am now an expert in precision grinding, CNC machining, and terms like Kovar, INVAR, and Inconel (those are exotic metal alloys for you non-machinists out there). OK, so maybe I’m not an “expert,” but now I know enough to write some informative and riveting search engine optimized (SEO) content.

As I’ve been researching, reading, and learning, I went back to a thought I have quite often: What did we do before the Internet? With a few search terms in Google, I’m directed to an endless string of reference material for my writing, including online journals, educational sites, and even Wikipedia.

I know, Wikipedia gets a bad rap because, technically, anyone can write anything they want — but that’s not entirely true. And the community nature of Wikipedia means there are well-written and well-researched entries on countless specialty terms and items that would not be included in a “traditional” encyclopedia. Sure, I bet about one-tenth of 1% of all Wikipedia entries have some questionable material. But as of today, the site boasts 2,645,778 total articles (in English, at least). So if one-tenth of 1% are somewhat inaccurate, that still leaves about 2 million, 643 thousand, 132 entries that are well-researched and factual (and who would make up an entry about CNC Machining, anyway?).

At DDA, we are always learning new things to make every project even better than the one before. Our programmers learn new code every day, our graphic designers figure out new and faster ways to develop eye-catching designs, our videographers stay up to date with the newest high definition technology, and us copywriters do more research in one day than I did in four years of college (that’s an exaggeration — maybe).

We’re always learning at DDA. But now it’s time for a quick break from learning for lunch — the weekend is fast approaching!